Featured

Awards Presented for Innovative Pediatric Medical Devices

The “Make Your Medical Device Pitch for Kids!” competition is sponsored by the National Capital Consortium for Pediatric Device Innovation (NCC-PDI), a FDA-funded consortium led by Children’s National and the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland. Four companies were awarded US$50,000 each and two were awarded US$25,000.

Cross-Disciplinary Medical Advances with Neuroengineering

Neuroengineering brings tools and techniques from the engineering fields into neuroscience to create new approaches for investigating the central nervous system (CNS). This fusion of disciplines is advancing our knowledge of how the CNS works and how we can enhance our natural cognitive and emotional function and restore neurological functions that are compromised by disease or injury.

On the Verge of Neuro-Motion

Chad Bouton, director of the Center for Bioelectronic Medicine and vice president of advanced engineering at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, which serves as the research arm of one of the largest health systems in the United States, has spent nearly two decades developing innovative medical technology and products that help diagnose and treat conditions including cancer, stroke, diabetes, and paralysis.

Reading Minds

When you see or think about an object, your brain engages in a unique pattern of activity tied specifically to that object. That’s how you know a cat is a cat, and not a dog or a house or a cloud.

Moving Objects with Your Mind

The best ideas are often simple in nature, though complex in detail, and great in potential. The stentrode is a perfect example, combining the familiar off-the-shelf technologies of a stent and an electrode.

Roach Biobots

Imagine a natural disaster, such as an earthquake, causing residential buildings to collapse and trapping the people in- side underneath the rubble. Over the following days, first responders spend a significant amount of time locating survivors.

From Brain to Body

Paralysis, whether caused by spinal cord injury, neurodegenerative disease, or other factors, poses a host of issues for patients. These include not just the inability to move parts of their bodies but potential problems with communication and bladder control as well. Fortunately, the last decade has seen promising technology advances to address these concerns.