Featured

A Balancing Act

It was the inaugural day of the study in 2005 when Brad Manor went out into the hot Louisiana sun to meet his first patient, James. Manor, now director of the Mobility and Brain Function Lab at the Harvard-affiliated Institute for Aging Research, was, at that time, a Ph.D. student at Louisiana State University.

Brain over Brawn

As much as we know about the vitamins, minerals, and types of exercise important to promoting good muscle health, many fundamental questions remain about skeletal and cardiac muscle.

Tracking Disease

Advances in automated data processing and machine learning now allow epidemiologists to meticulously sift through the millions of digital traces we collectively leave behind each day as we conduct our lives online—through Internet searches, social media posts, or the use of our mobile phones.

Committing to Memory

Cell phone chimes, sticky notes, even the proverbial string around a finger—these timehonored external cues help guard against our inevitable memory lapses. But some internal help to the brain itself may be on the way in the form of what’s being called memory prosthetics.

Turning the Unknown into Known

Taken as a whole, rare diseases are not very rare. Even though a rare disease by definition is one that affects fewer than 200,000 Americans or fewer than one in 2,000 Europeans at any time, when rare diseases are considered together, they affect some 350 million people worldwide.